S** What's R*al


  1. Pinka thighs

     


  2. lizzywhimsy:

    megcubed:

    The average age in Boston in the early 1770s was 14. More than half the population of Boston was under 21 in the events leading up to the American Revolution.

    It really puts everything into a completely different context, doesn’t it?

     #England: YOU DO YOUR CHORES LIKE I ASKED YOU #America: YOU’RE NOT MY REAL MOM #*slams door* #England: OOOHH YOU’RE GONNA GET IT #America: EAT MY SHORTS (beggars-opera)

    (via spookyjealous)

     

  3. ponko

     

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  5. actualbloggerwangyao:

    alvaroandtheworld:

    ultrafacts:

    Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

    THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

    No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

    And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

    So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

    it reminds me of how Japanese women invented hiragana, ‘women’s writing’. Japanese women make their own culture <3

    (via mrfatcakes)

     

  6. nohetero-superpotterlock:

    good thing harry potter didnt choose slytherin

    I know he speaks in an american accent in these but I keep reading it with his british accent

    (Source: sebastianstoned, via spiderjewel)

     

  7. mini-tuffs:

    some silly doodles

    MT don’t do this to me

     

  8. mini-tuffs:

    Don’t ya wanna just stop on by

     

  9. prokopetz:

    grrspit:

    nessanotarized:

    nativefemboy:

    thartist72:

    “In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

    A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.”

    powerful Black Science Man

    Exactly.

    “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

    This is a good illustration of what’s wrong with the US criminal justice system.

    I’m more struck by the second anecdote, in which he was evidently disqualified from jury duty for displaying the ability to do math.

    (via sincereseppuku)

     

  10. (Source: burekevan, via spiderjewel)